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Head Start - Annual Report/School Readiness Goals
 
     
 

Download a pdf of the 2013/14 Report.

The following information regarding the Cayuga/Seneca Community Action Agency’s Head Start program is made public annually in accordance with Sec. 644 of the Head Start Act.  What follows is a summary of Head Start program year 2013-2014.

 
Sec. 644 (2)
 
(A) The total amount of public and private funds received and the amount from each source. 
   
02CH1135-46  
Revenue Actual
Health and Human Service 3,464,813
NYS Department of Health 140,873
Moravia Central School District 15,220
Jordan Elbridge Central School District  11,069
Auburn Enlarged City School District  270,399
Contributions 2,040
Inkind Donations 552,021
Total Revenue 4,456,435
   

(B) An explanation of budgetary expenditures and proposed budget for the fiscal year.
 
02CH1135-46
Expense Approved Budget Actual Balance
Personnel 1,877,905 1,867,393 10,512
Fringe  619,709 608,336 11,373
Travel 12,000 11,908 92
Equipment     -
Supplies      
HHS 89,382 89,509 (127)
USDA 140,873 140,873 -
Contractual 598,229 580,537 17,692
Facilities/Construction - - -
Other 267,588 308,249 (40,661)
Grantee Share 866,203 849,631 16,572
Total Expenditures 4,471,889 4,456,436 15,543
 
 

(C) Total number of children and families served, the average monthly enrollment, and the percentage of eligible children served.
Four hundred and four (404) children and their families and 11 pregnant women received Head Start/EHS services in the 2013-2014 program year.

The average monthly enrollment in 2013-2014 was 100%.

Ninety-five percent (95%) of children served were income eligible for the program based on the poverty guidelines, receiving SSI, Foster Care placement, homeless, or receiving TANF funds.  Head Start regulations allow for up to 10% of children served to be from over income families. 

 
(D) The results of the most recent review by the Secretary and the financial audit.
 

Cuddy & Ward, LLP completed the annual audit and issued an unqualified opinion on the financial statements for the period ending 7/31/14.  There were no management findings.

 
(E) The percentage of enrolled children that received medical and dental exams.
 

100%

 
(F) Information about parent involvement.
 

An essential part of C/SCAA Head Start is the involvement of parents and the engagement of parents in the education of their children, program planning, and operating activities.  Parents serve as members of Policy Council, attend Parent Committee meetings, and have a voice in decision-making for the program.

Parents are their children’s first teachers.  At C/SCAA Head Start, parent engagement is highly encouraged.  Parents attend Parent/Teacher Conferences twice per year and have at least three home visits with their child’s teacher.  These avenues afford parents the opportunity to receive and lend input into their child’s individualized curriculum plan.  Parents also support the schools efforts by conducting activities in their home with their children that are designed to enrich their child’s educational experience.  Each enrolled Head Start family also received three free books and parent activity guides throughout the program year in an effort to enhance the home learning environment and to encourage families to read to their children.  Parent volunteers in the classroom and on field trips were also valuable ways in which parents stayed involved.  

Parent education activities are planned to be responsive to the expressed needs and interests of individual parents and as members of a group. The Parent Interest Survey is completed by individuals at the time of the initial/orientation visit.  This survey is utilized to bring individual information into the home by family workers and home visitors. 

Head Start provides opportunities for parents to be included in the devel­opment of the program’s curriculum and approach to child development and education.  Throughout the year parents are asked at Parent Committee Meetings and informally to discuss the program’s curricu­lum and make suggestions for improvement.     

This year parents had the opportunity to attend Parent Orientation, Dads Take Your Child to School Day, Sit n Sip, Cooking Matters, Curriculum Night, Family Fun Night, Community Night, a Healthy Winter Fun Fair, and various classroom and end-of-the-year activities. 

Parent and family engagement in Head Start is about building relationships with families that support family well-being, strong relationships between parents and their children, and ongoing learning and development for both parents and children.

These relationships with families support family well-being, strong parent-child relationships, and ongoing learning and development of parents and children alike. Family engagement happens in the home, early childhood program, school, and community. It is a shared responsibility with all those who support children’s learning.

  • Parents and families support and advocate for their child’s learning and development as they transition to new learning environments, including Early Head Start to Head Start, EHS/HS to other early learning environments, and Head Start to kindergarten through elementary school.
  • Parents and families advance their own learning interests through education, training and other experiences that support their parenting, careers, and life goals.
  • Parents and families observe, guide, promote, and participate in the everyday learning of their children at home, school, and in their communities.
  • Beginning with transitions to parenthood, parents and families develop warm relationships that nurture their child’s learning and development.
  • Parents and families participate in leadership development, decision making, program policy development, or in community and state organizing activities to improve children’s development and learning experiences.
 
(G) School Readiness Goal
 

The school readiness goals of the Head Start program are based on sound child development principles and are aligned with the Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework, the NYS learning standards, the local school districts, and the Head Start curriculum.


LANGUAGE
   
Goal I.  Children will comprehend increasingly complex and varied vocabulary.
Goal II.  Children will use an increasingly complex and varied spoken vocabulary to communicate needs and express ideas.
 
LITERACY
   
Goal I:   Children will demonstrate the ability to communicate their ideas using written representation, symbols, and letters.
Goal II:  Children will show interest in shared and independent reading experiences.
Goal III:  Children will demonstrate an awareness that language can be broken into words, syllables, and smaller pieces of sound.
Goal IV:  Children will demonstrate the names and sounds associated with letters.
Goal V:  Children will demonstrate word recognition skills.
Goal VI:  Children will demonstrate interest, awareness, and knowledge of books. 
Goal VII: Children will demonstrate knowledge about authors and illustrators.
Goal VIII: Children will demonstrate the awareness and knowledge of print concepts.
 
COGNITION AND GENERAL KNOWLEDGE
   
Goal I: Children will use seek multiple solutions to a question, task, or problem using a variety of methods.
Goal II: Children will demonstrate knowledge of concepts and facts related to the natural and physical world around them.
Goal III: Children will demonstrate an understanding of numbers and be able to use numbers to describe relationships and solve problems.
Goal IV: Children will demonstrate an understanding of shapes, their properties, and how objects are related to one another.
Goal V: Children will demonstrate knowledge of patterns, sequencing, and critical thinking skills necessary to predict and classify objects in a pattern.
Goal VI: Children will demonstrate the understanding of attributes and relative properties of objects as related to size, capacity, and area.
Goal VII: Children will use their understanding of technology to increase their learning.
 
PHYSICAL WELL-BEING AND MOTOR DEVELOPMENT
   
Goal I: Children will possess and maintain age appropriate physical well-being.
Goal II: Children will demonstrate knowledge of and practice healthy and safe habits.
Goal III: Children will demonstrate coordination and control of large motor muscles.
Goal IV: Children will demonstrate eye-hand coordination and dexterity needed to manipulate objects.
Goal V: Children will use their senses to guide learning.
 
SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL DEVELOPMENT
   
Goal I: Children will demonstrate healthy relationships and interactions with adults and peers.
Goal II: Children will recognize themselves as unique individuals having their own abilities, characteristics, feelings, and interests.
Goal III: Children will demonstrate the ability to recognize and regulate emotions, impulses, and behavior in response to their needs, feeling, and events.
Goal IV: Children will demonstrate a healthy range of emotional expression and pro-social problem solving skills in social interactions.
 
APPROACHES TO LEARNING
   
Goal I: Children will demonstrate curiosity, interest, and willingness in learning new things and having new experiences.
Goal II: Children will actively and confidently engage in play and a means of exploration and learning.
Goal III: Children will demonstrate the ability to begin and finish activities with persistence and attention.
Goal IV: Children will demonstrate an interest and engagement in group experiences.
 
CREATIVE ARTS
   
Goal I: Children will express themselves by engaging in musical activities.
Goal II: Children will express themselves and represent what they know, think, feel, and believe through dance and creative movement.
Goal III: Children will express themselves and represent what they know, think, believe, and feel though visual arts.
Goal IV: Children will portray events, characters, and stories through dramatic play.
 
SOCIAL STUDIES KNOWLEDGE
   
Goal I: Children will develop a basic awareness of self and will demonstrate an awareness of self within the context of family and community.
Goal II: Children will demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between people, places, and the environment in which they live.
Goal III: Children will demonstrate an understanding of roles, rights, and responsibilities.
Goal IV: Children will develop an understanding that events that happened in the past relate to themselves, family, and community.
 
ENGLISH  LANGUAGE DEVELOPMENT
   
Goal I: Children will demonstrate the ability to comprehend the English language.
Goal II: Children will demonstrate the ability to speak the English language.
Goal III: Children will understand and respond to books, storytelling, and songs presented in the English language.
   
PY 2013-2014 Child Assessment Outcomes

COR Advantage is the tool utilized by the CSCAA Head Start/UPK Education Staff to assess early childhood development of the children enrolled in the program, ranging from infancy to Kindergarten.  This observation tool guides staff through the process of gathering measurable anecdotes on all children, focusing on the following content areas: 

  • Approaches to Learning
  • Creative Arts
  • Language Development
  • Literacy
  • Logic/Reasoning
  • Math
  • Physical/Health Development
  • Science
  • Social/Emotional
  • Social Studies
Each content area comprises items that focus on key early learning concepts.  Teachers gather observations on children over time and score each item.  Following the COR Advantage Scoring Guide they use an eight-level rating scale ranging from 0 (lowest) to 7 (highest).  The level 0 to level 7 scoring provides an overlapping range so that children are scored at the developmental and ability level appropriate for them.  The information gathered aids staff in planning individualized learning experiences for each child.  Infants and toddlers generally fall into the level 0-2 range.  Older toddlers can score higher.  Preschoolers generally fall into the level 2-5 range.  They can rate lower or higher on any given COR item.  Kindergarten levels typically fall into the level 4 to level 7 range. 

Infants and Toddler: 0-36 month old children

The Early Head Start infant and toddler groups are assessed three times per program year using anecdotal recordings that are gathered using the High Scope COR (Child Observation Record) Advantage tool. Observations are taken on these groups of children during scheduled home visits as well as at planned socialization times at the center.  Anecdotal observations are recorded on all children and rated using the 0-7 scale in each of the domain areas.  It is expected that children transitioning to the Early Head Start 2-year-old Combination Option program in September 2014 will be working in the Level 1 to Level 2 range in all domain areas by the end of Session 3 (Spring 2014).  It is expected that children transitioning to the Head Start 3-year-old program in September 2014 will be working in the Level 2 to Level 3 range in all domain areas by the end of Session 3 (Spring 2014)*. 
*For more concise reporting the age groups are broken down into 12 month increments. 

EHS Birth to 12 month old children (Turning 1 by 12/01/2014)

Domain Area Session 1 Session 2 Session 3  
I Approaches to Learning 0.21 0.49 0.82  
II Creative Arts 0.03 0.26 0.59  
III Language Development 0.04 0.19 0.52  
IV Literacy 0.04 0.23 0.36  
V Logic/Reasoning 0.16 0.43 0.75  
VI Math 0.03 0.15 0.35  
VII Physical/Health Development 0.24 0.41 0.77  
VIII Science 0.16 0.51 0.78  
IX Social/Emotional Development 0.11 0.41 0.91  
X Social Studies 0.09 0.33 0.61  

EHS 1 year old children (Turning 2 by 12/01/2014)

Domain Area Session 1 Session 2 Session 3  
I Approaches to Learning 1.36 1.73 2.00  
II Creative Arts 0.98 1.35 1.83  
III Language Development 0.98 1.47 1.59  
IV Literacy 1.33 1.69 1.78  
V Logic/Reasoning 1.05 1.47 1.87  
VI Math 0.88 1.39 1.89  
VII Physical/Health Development 1.39 1.72 2.14  
VIII Science 0.96 1.42 1.94  
IX Social/Emotional Development 1.13 1.62 1.82  
X Social Studies 1.14 1.56 1.98  

EHS 2 year old children (turning 3 by 12/01/2014)

Domain Area Session 1 Session 2 Session 3  
I Approaches to Learning 1.19 1.79 2.03  
II Creative Arts 1.16 1.67 2.01  
III Language Development 1.31 1.74 1.93  
IV Literacy 1.44 1.71 1.95  
V Logic/Reasoning 1.13 1.66 2.01  
VI Math 1.14 1.62 1.91  
VII Physical/Health Development 1.69 2.24 2.46  
VIII Science 1.13 1.65 1.99  
IX Social/Emotional Development 1.10 1.93 2.16  
X Social Studies 1.17 1.89 2.12  

Summary:
A great deal of learning and development occurs in the first three years of life, establishing the foundation for developing skills that are the essential components of school readiness.  The above data indicates that the children 0-36 months old enrolled in the Early Head Start program exhibited consistent growth and developed new skills at a steady pace.  Children in this age range developed their ability to express themselves, problem-solve, and use self-help skills.  They formed positive relationships with staff and peers.  They are better able to manage their emotions as well as respond to other’s feelings.  In developing these relationships, this group of children fine-tuned their capabilities to interact with each other by communicating wants, needs, and interests in both verbal and non-verbal ways.  They demonstrated interest in literacy activities that occurred in their learning environment, including listening to stories and actively participating in rhymes and songs.  Lastly, this group of young learners eagerly explored their learning environment through the manipulation of objects, sorting, and exploration of their learning space.

Preschool: 3 and 4-year-old children

Data on the Head Start three-year-old children is aggregated and assessed three times per program year. Observations are taken on this age group in the classroom setting at the center using the High/Scope COR Advantage tool.  Anecdotal observations are recorded on all children and rated using the 0-7 scale in each of the domain areas.  It is expected that children transitioning to the Head Start/UPK four-year-old program in September 2014 will be working in the Level 3 to Level 4 range in all domain areas by the end of Session 3 (Spring 2014). 

Head Start 3-year-old children (turning 4 by 12/01/2014)

Domain Area Session 1 Session 2 Session 3  
I Approaches to Learning 2.18 3.08 3.59  
II Creative Arts 2.11 3.10 3.61  
III Language Development 1.99 2.73 3.26  
IV Literacy 2.39 2.98 3.49  
V Logic/Reasoning 1.95 2.86 3.43  
VI Math 2.76 3.24    
VII Physical/Health Development 2.51 3.37 3.80  
VIII Science 2.25 2.92 3.38  
IX Social/Emotional Development 2.00 2.93 3.60  
X Social Studies 2.05 2.95 3.50  

Summary:
The 3-year-old group demonstrated tremendous growth during the 2013-2014 program year!  Outcome data and indicators illustrate that the three-year-old children transitioning to a four-year-old Head Start/UPK program in September 2014 developed their ability to communicate choices/plans, solve problems, and interact with staff and peers.  Data also indicates that they exhibited an increased awareness of language and literacy in their environment.  They used more complex patterns of speech, demonstrated an increased familiarity with books, pointed out letter names, read/interpreted symbols, and could make recognizable alphabet symbols in their work.  Their reasoning/logic skills and the development of their number sense continued to progress, as well. 

Additional data on children’s cognitive abilities gathered during the 2013-2014 program year  indicates that 79% of all three-year-old children enrolled in the program (n=113 children) were able to identify some uppercase letters and 58% were able to identify some lower case letters of the alphabet.  Eighty-three percent (83%) of the three-year-old children could count out loud by rote to 5 and 42% were starting to print number symbols.  Eighty-nine percent (89%) readily knew basic position words and 87% of this group were able to name 10 basic colors.  22% of these children were able to print their first name by the end of the program year.*

*It is expected that in order to be Kindergarten ready, each 4 year old child in the program will be able to identify 10 or more upper case letters    and 10 or more lower case letters over a given of period time.  Ideally, it is our expectation that all children transitioning to Kindergarten will know all 26 upper and lower case letters upon leaving the HS program.

Head Start/UPK 4-year-old children (turning 5 by 12/01/2014)
The four- year-old HS/UPK children are also assessed through observations gathered in the classroom setting at the center using the High Scope COR Advantage tool.  Anecdotal observations are recorded on all children and rated using the 0-7 scale in each of the domain areas.  Again, the data is collected and assessed three times throughout the year.  It is expected that these children will be working in the Level 4 to Level 5 range in all domain areas by the end of Session 3 (Spring 2014) thus indicating that they have acquired the critical learning foundations reflective of school readiness.  These scores should also indicate that these children are well prepared and ready to transition to their next level of programming, a Kindergarten classroom, in the fall of 2014. 

Domain Area Session 1 Session 2 Session 3  
I Approaches to Learning 3.06 3.91 4.67  
II Creative Arts 2.93

4.13

4.75  
III Language Development 2.65 3.69 4.37  
IV Literacy 2.89 3.65 4.32  
V Logic/Reasoning 2.84 3.80 4.51  
VI Math 2.80 3.75 4.53  
VII Physical/Health Development 3.30 4.50 5.29  
VIII Science 3.06 3.87 4.58  
IX Social/Emotional Development 2.94 3.83 4.59  
X Social Studies 3.14 3.97 4.80  

Summary:
The children in the four-year-old HS program demonstrated tremendous gains throughout the 2013-2014 program year in all learning domains!  Their verbal communication skills continuously developed to the degree that they could clearly indicate their needs/wants, solve problems, and verbalize their emotions, often using longer give-and-take exchanges when in conversation.  Their cognitive skills were such that they could exercise logic/reasoning in creative ways, understand receptive and expressive language, use a larger vocabulary, identify pictures/print, and use writing tools to print recognizable letters, particularly the letters in their name.  Additionally, gains were made in the areas of math and science regarding sorting/patterning, understanding the properties of an object, counting/numeration, sequencing, and change/causality.

Furthermore, additional cognitive assessment data was collected on the four-year-old Head Start/UPK children (n=159) during the 2013-2014 program year.  Upon transitioning to Kindergarten a majority of the four-year-old children could count out loud by rote to at least 20.  They were able to print at least seven recognizable numbers.  Ninety-five percent (95%) readily knew basic position words and were able to name 10 basic colors.  On average,  this group could identify at least 16 upper case letters of the alphabet and at least 14 lower case letters of the alphabet*.   Eighty-one percent (81%) of these children were printing their first name recognizably upon transitioning to Kindergarten this fall.

*It is expected that in order to be Kindergarten ready, each 4 year old child will be able to identify 10 or more uppercase letters and 10 or more lowercase letters over a period of time.   Ideally, it is our expectation that all children transitioning to Kindergarten will know all 26 upper and lowercase letters upon leaving the HS program.

           
 
     
     
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